Listen of the Week: Body Count

Bloodlust, by Body Count

And while plenty of acts have chosen to speak out on such issues, few have come across as fearless as Body Count do here. Compared to their goofy, cartoonish return on Manslaughter, Bloodlust proves that there’s still plenty of substance within, the sort of heavy, mercilessly politicised material that Body Count do exceptionally well.

ALBUM REVIEW: ‘Bloodlust’ by Body Count

Listen of the Week: Body Count

Listen of the Week: Mount Eerie

A Crow Looked at Me, by Mount Eerie

There is nothing this review can add to the experience of listening to A Crow Looked At Me. Sure, there’ll be an incongruous Lou Bega reference at around the 600-word mark for some light relief (it doesn’t really work) and a Nabokov quote in the penultimate paragraph to pretend I’m well-read (I’m not) but they’re hardly worth sticking around for. Scroll down to the bottom of the page and you won’t find any score attached. Even awarding this work the full ten-out-of-ten would feel too callous given the tragic circumstances of the record’s gestation and its heartbreaking subject matter.

Instead, you’d be strongly advised to stop reading this right now. Please, all I ask is that you just go away, sit down and listen to the music and the words contained on this LP with your complete and undivided attention.

http://drownedinsound.com/releases/19863/reviews/4150889

Listen of the Week: Mount Eerie

Finding Zen in Cowtown: 30 poems about Kansas City

If yer in and about KC on 4/1:

Celebrate the kickoff of National Poetry Month by joining us for a reading of poetry about Kansas City at the beautiful, downtown Ilus Davis Park!

Spartan Press is so delighted to release “Finding Zen in Cow Town,” a book featuring the poems of thirty poets who live in and around Kansas City. This unique collection features poems by former Kansas Poet Laureate, Denise Low; co-founder of the Latino Writers Collective*, Jose Faus; inaugural Poet Laureate of 18th and Vine, Glenn North; and many more spoken word and poetry voices in our community.

It’s so moving to read poems which talk about local BBQ joints and sports teams, major intersections and highways, neighborhoods, public figures and the shared history of Kansas City citizens; this book is a true-blue dedication to our home, our City of Fountains, our Cowtown.

https://www.facebook.com/events/389916454706715/permalink/389916554706705/

Finding Zen in Cowtown: 30 poems about Kansas City

Best laid plans of avocado cultists

my juvenile plan to write a poem a day for the first 100 days of trump’s presidency have been thwarted by influenza. so, yer bright and sad and beautiful eyes only had to suffer through 48 days of hastily-construed wailing and railing as opposed to 100. i’m sad to have been broken in such a way but life is varied, complex, and always unpredictable.

you’ll get three installments of waterwood this week, however, to make up for me missing friday. i hope that makes you smile.

don’t catch no flus out there, party people. flus ain’t kind.

Best laid plans of avocado cultists

March 8th, 2017

The Prez don’t care about you
And I’m not saying another would do –
But I can tell from the rules
he’s tryna lay down thaaat:
The Prez don’t care about you

Oh, the Prez is quite unglued
And I’m not saying another wouldn’t be, too –
But I can tell from his words and his
and rants and raves thaaat:
The Prez is quite unglued

The Prez hangs with a shady crew
And I’m not saying another wouldn’t know some bad dudes –
But I can tell from the way they talk
behind closed doors thaaat:
The Prez hangs with a shady crew

The Prez just ain’t got a clue
And I’m not saying another would act like they knew –
But I can tell from the questions
that he asks about his accusations thaaat:
The Prez just ain’t got a clue

Oh! the Prez don’t care about you
And I’m not saying another would do –
But I can tell from the life
that he’s built for himself thaaat:
The Prez don’t care
The Prez don’t care
No, the Prez don’t about you

March 8th, 2017

Listen of the Week: Blanck Mass

World Eater, by Blanck Mass

Blanck Mass, we learn, is intended to represent “a previous year teeming with anger, violence, confusion and frustration”, and as the nine minutes of Rhesus Negative unfold hyperkinetically, a treated voice somewhere very deep in the mix conveying some nameless dread, it does feel as if one is being smacked repeatedly around the head with an analogue synth, albeit in a good way.

https://www.theguardian.com/music/2017/mar/02/blanck-mass-world-eater-review-brutal-noise-with-frequent-sweet-spots

Listen of the Week: Blanck Mass