The Clouds O’er the Lake of Heavenly Tears

You are too young
to be wandering
through a maze filled
with masked individuals.

Too young
to be stopped
from touching
anyone at all.

The masked ones
only look at you.
They do not speak.
Can they speak at all?

They never even move
their dark eyes
from your worried face.

You feel alone
in this maze,
and the only thought
that keeps repeating
is, “What if
one of these people
were to suddenly
turn around and attack me?
Would it be the end?”

But none
of the masked people
attack you.

They only look at you,
watching.

You feel like
they are
judging you.

Are they looking for something?
Are they looking for something bad?

In the distance,
you believe you see
your father, waving.

He calls out to you,
but you cannot hear
what he is saying.

You walk
towards the figure, and,
as you do,
one of the masked people
grabs you by the wrist.

His hand is cold.
The masked man whispers,
“Do not go gentle
into that good night.”

He draws
a blade
and stabs
you in
the gut.

You fall to the ground
in silence,
and the darkness
of eternity
covers you.

***

You arise again
in the afterlife,
by the Lake
of Heavenly Tears.

Alongside you
are mothers mourning
the premature loss
of innocent children.

It is their tears
that fill the lake.

The sky is red.
There is blood in the lake.

The mothers cry, “We have nothing left to lose.”
The lake responds, “But do you understand now?”

The sky is blue.
There are bones in the lake.

The sky is pink.
There is longing in the lake.

The mothers weep
for all their dead.

A voice calls from the clouds,
“You must choose, angels.
After all,
the only thing
the dead have lost
is their life.”

The Clouds O’er the Lake of Heavenly Tears

Basic Connectomics: A Citizen’s Guide to the Connectomy

     to chart the connections:
     a connectome
     what each part is,
     how it supports the whole,
     how it ought to interact with other parts
          and the environment

     how might we grasp the entirety?

     understanding
     all this complexity
     millions of things
     happening simultaneously
                                                                                     within
without

     no point
     you can say,
     ‘I now understand’

     the world is.
     ideas conform.

     information
     is the enemy
     of understanding

     which details are irrelevant?
     making sense of facts
     truth through an unfocused lens
     sculpted by language
     processed by culture

                                                                                     watching ice melt
we stoke the fire

Basic Connectomics: A Citizen’s Guide to the Connectomy

Altered States

This view—called “cosmopsychism” in modern philosophy, although our preferred formulation of it boils down to what has classically been called “idealism”—is that there is only one, universal, consciousness. The physical universe as a whole is the extrinsic appearance of universal inner life, just as a living brain and body are the extrinsic appearance of a person’s inner life.

You don’t need to be a philosopher to realize the obvious problem with this idea: people have private, separate fields of experience. We can’t normally read your thoughts and, presumably, neither can you read ours. Moreover, we are not normally aware of what’s going on across the universe and, presumably, neither are you. So, for idealism to be tenable, one must explain—at least in principle—how one universal consciousness gives rise to multiple, private but concurrently conscious centers of cognition, each with a distinct personality and sense of identity.

And here is where dissociation comes in. We know empirically from DID that consciousness can give rise to many operationally distinct centers of concurrent experience, each with its own personality and sense of identity. Therefore, if something analogous to DID happens at a universal level, the one universal consciousness could, as a result, give rise to many alters with private inner lives like yours and ours. As such, we may all be alters—dissociated personalities—of universal consciousness.

Moreover, as we’ve seen earlier, there is something dissociative processes look like in the brain of a patient with DID. So, if some form of universal-level DID happens, the alters of universal consciousness must also have an extrinsic appearance. We posit that this appearance is life itself: metabolizing organisms are simply what universal-level dissociative processes look like.

metabolizing organisms are simply what universal-level dissociative processes look like

metabolizing organisms are simply what universal-level dissociative processes look like

metabolizing organisms are simply what universal-level dissociative processes look like

metabolizing organisms are simply what universal-level dissociative processes look like

metabolizing organisms are simply what universal-level dissociative processes look like

metabolizing organisms are simply what universal-level dissociative processes look like

metabolizing organisms are simply what universal-level dissociative processes look like

 

https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/observations/could-multiple-personality-disorder-explain-life-the-universe-and-everything/

 

Altered States

The girls were left to inherit a magic to help them become

‖‬ Who knows magic anymore? ‖‬
‖‬ Who reads spells and incantations? ‖‬
‖‬ Who speaks charms and curses? ‖‬

                              I’ve heard there is a secret group,
                              hidden in the hills,
                              who can read the future                               in a cup of tea
                              under the light
                              of a full harvest moon.

‖ ‬In the hills
there is a hut
where the future
has a story. ‖‪

‖ If you want to know more,
you just need to talk
to one of the little girls
who makes the hills her home‬. ‖

‖ ‬But who are these little girls? ‖

‖ Well, not a lot of people know,
except the witches,
and oh! but do they know. ‖

                              The story is a long one,
                              and it starts here
                              in this little hut,‬
                              ‬with the little girls
                              standing on the mud roof.

                              They came
                              from the world of fairies
                              to study this magic,

‖ and when they come
to the hut
in the hills
they must stand
on the roof. ‖ ‪

‖ These are not
ordinary fairies. ‖

‣                               ‖ ‬The world the witches see is one in which the future is a place, ‖ ‬and the world the witches see in the future,…they call The City. ム      ‖ ‬As far as anyone knows, ‖ ‬there are no other cities in the world. ‖ ‬In the past, ‖ ‬there was a time when there were many worlds and there were ordinary fairies. ‖ ‬But then, ‖                              those worlds were destroyed, ‖ ‬and when those worlds finally disappeared, ‖ �                               the little girls left behind were shown how to stand on mud roofs and learn a witch’s way.                                                   ᐛ                                         ༼                            ‖

三三三三三三三三三三三三三三三三三三三
三三三三三三三三三三
三三三三三
三三

The girls were left to inherit a magic to help them become

I know you’re a priest, but I’m not going to be a priest

Every step
is a protopian trek
through a jungle overgrown
with thick roots and poison leaves.

Yes, even the poisonous
cannot contain their self-interest.
Even the revolution
must surely bring oppression.

My advice to people
who are considering
becoming priests:
Be sure to wear clean underwear.
Be aware that not every priest is like you.
Don’t get into fights with other priests unless they deserve it.
Never be ashamed.
Only apologize to children.

I’m not some crazy
priest-hoarding freak
who is going out of his mind
with plans to destroy this world on a whim.

However, if that turns out to be the case, then I’m sorry, I was only kidding. I’m just kidding. Just kidding.

Here is a joke
I wrote in seminary,
by far my favorite joke,
the one that I always come back to:

“How do you think Jesus died?

Do you think he was hit in the head with a rock?

Do you think he was hit by a bus?

Do you think he was hit by lightning?

Do you think he was hit by a car?

Do you think he was hit by a train?

Do you think he was hit by lightning?

Do you think he was hit by a train?

Do you think he was hit by a train?
Do you think he was hit by a train?

Do you think he was hit by a train?
Do you think he was hit by a train? Do you think he was hit by a train? Do you think he was hit by a train? Do you think he was hit by a train? Do you think he was hit by a train? Do you think he was hit by a train? Do you think he was hit by a train? Do you think he was hit by a train? Do you think he was hit by a train? Do you think he was hit by a train? Do you think he was hit by a train? Do you think he was hit by a train? Do you think he was hit by a train? Do you think he was hit by a train? Do you think he was? Do you? Do you?”

Get it?

I know you’re a priest, but I’m not going to be a priest