Game Over, Man. Game Over.

I was standing
on a sidewalk
with my friend.

Five aliens
towered above us.
The skies portended
inclement weather.

I asked one alien,
hairless and grey,
if it was indeed an alien
or a government hoax.

It looked at me and said,
“Yes, I am an alien.”
I looked at the alien next to it, and asked,
“For real?”
It said, “You distrust our words
because of our appearance,”
and started laughing.

Alien laughter
sounds like broken glass
and two kittens
in a garbage disposal.

I smiled
and asked
if we could play a game.
It smiled back
and replied
that it was already playing a game.

I took this to heart.

A hush fell over the sidewalk.
To exit the awkward silence,
I walked to a nearby parking lot.
Only dark clouds followed me.

There I waited
for the rain to fall.

Game Over, Man. Game Over.

58 thoughts on “Game Over, Man. Game Over.

  1. Did this actually happen, or are you just telling a story? I understand these things, so if it did, I can counsel you. What you saw were demonic apparitions in bodily form. This kind is particularly dangerous.

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    1. jdoublep says:

      Appreciate you reading and commenting. I would say the piece above is 63% fantasy, 24% actuality, 7% prophecy, and 6% memory. Thank you for your offer of counsel. I accept. I would like to define a couple of terms prior to counseling, if that’s ok? To define: “demonic” (or rather “demon”, from which we can determine “demonic”) and “apparition”. Thanks!

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        1. jdoublep says:

          Thank you for helping set those terms. Some follow-up. So, an appearance but not a thing in and of itself, like a mirage or vision, and such with a moral standing? And, per your initial comment, such that has taken on a physical form?

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          1. Dunno. It’s either I live in the delusion that they exist, or I don’t. There’s a lot of strange territory that comes with believing in Aliens. Stuff the human mind isn’t capable of rationalizing. It’s either the alien is true, and therefore nothing is, or the alien doesn’t exist, and therefore truth does. The fact is Hell, very much, is a place where there is no truth. It’s a place where one cannot know the truth. It’s a place where there is nothing true; in a way, hell is a perpetual delusion. Like a dream one enters into, where they suffer for eternity. In my view of it. I just imagine the worst thing possible, and then it getting worse and worse. That’s the extent of God’s wrath. But, God’s wrath is good, because it means there is also mercy and kindness. It means there is also established truth. That things exist on the very nature of their existence.

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            1. jdoublep says:

              I find it very simple to rationalize a belief in alien life due to probabilities. I find it difficult to rationalize alien life would care to visit Earth. I disagree more with the false dilemma: “either the alien is true, and therefore nothing is, or the alien doesn’t exist, and therefore truth does.” Whether alien life exists or not has no bearing on other truth propositions. I agree that hell is a place (loosely defined) without truth. I disagree that God has wrath (or any emotion whatsoever. I don’t conceive of God as having any will. Will implies an ability to do otherwise. God may change (and not in an old covenant/new covenant sense but in the sense of a continued unfolding), but God cannot do otherwise). We might discuss God as being that emotion which exists beyond all rational thought and control.

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              1. No. That’s why you need Jesus to teach you. You have constructed an idol. And part of that idol is the cosmology you’ve been taught. I mean, I’m just telling you how it is. God is bound in the person of Jesus Christ. And He’s talked about in the Old and New Testament. God doesn’t change, either. Neither did the law. The Law was based on a covenant to Jacob, and our faith is based in a prior covenant with Abraham.

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                1. jdoublep says:

                  To what idols and cosmology do you refer? What I was taught, I learned from Jesus: the kingdom of heaven is within and love your neighbor as yourself. Jesus had a mystical experience and, as a Jew, had to express something already ineffable within a Jewish framework. God is bound in everything (this is why we are commanded to love our neighbors as ourselves). Now I understand that’s heresy (though plenty of Abrahamic mystics have been condemned for reaching similar conclusions. At any rate, I am ecstatic that your experiences have brought you to a place of grace.

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                2. Well, you’ll be fine. Just don’t believe in aliens. Just as long as you believe Jesus Christ is Come in the Flesh. You MUST believe He was God come in a Bodily Form. And you must believe in the Trinity. And hold onto that with everything.

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  2. There’s one more thing I need to say to you.

    If you believe in them, you’ll be wholly given unto their delusion, and you will reject everything that is beautiful and true. This belief, I had it for about two years, and it only caused delusions. It’s a demonic thing. There are no aliens. They are simply manifestations of evil spirits, taken a physical form for the last times. They will deceive many, and bring many to hell. You can believe this, and be saved. Or you can be given to their delusion, and live in the world they will create for you. Which will be a haunt of dragons and satyrs. I tremble telling you this.

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    1. jdoublep says:

      By “this belief”, you are referring to a belief in aliens? Before we continue too far ahead, I would like to have some terms defined, if ya please? Please define “last times”. Please define “hell”. Please define “saved”. To what do you refer with the phrases, “their delusion” and “the world they will create for you” and a “haunt of dragons and satyrs”?
      Terms aside, why do you tremble when telling me such things?

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      1. Yeah, I once saw one. A legit sighting. I went for years under the delusion that they existed as creatures from space. Took me to some crazy places. Real crazy places. What cured the mania was accepting that they were appearances of evil entities. I really don’t want to get burdened with the proof. I’d rather you think this is crazy, than for me to go through my list of proofs. I’m satisfied I know what they are. From everything I’ve witnessed. To be honest, the whole alien thing is a big delusion.

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        1. jdoublep says:

          There’s not need to be burdened by proof for creatures from space nor evil entities (though that burden is placed upon you by virtue of making any claims of their existence). Additionally, regarding proof, I’m not too sure how one would provide such with regards to apparitions. Why did accepting that what you witnessed was an evil entity make the witnessing any easier to accept than if said witnessing were a creature from space? When you write, “whole alien thing” to what do you refer?

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          1. It’s easier for me to believe aliens are demons, than actual creatures from outer space. In either regard, the alien is a creature, be it angelic or simple flesh. I just cannot believe they are real. Because of the delusions such belief creates. It’s my opinion that if something is true, it will create more mental wellbeing. If something creates pathological symptoms, such as mania or psychosis, it cannot be real. If by merely thinking of something—seriously thinking of it–one gets mentally ill, it cannot be true. For, then the thing in question wouldn’t be rational, ergo, it would be a delusion.

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      2. Again, I’d rather you think I’m lying to you, than for me to go through the actual proof.

        I ‘d rather prove that God exists, than aliens. We can divert the conversation to that instead.

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        1. jdoublep says:

          I don’t (at this point in the conversation) believe you are lying. Nor do I think you should spend time proving anything about aliens or evil entities. I’d be happy to read your proof of God’s existence. Though I’m not necessarily needing one, it’d be a pleasure to consider your argument. 🙂

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          1. All roads lead back to Christ. All reasonable ones. In terms of Ethics, the greatest sages proved His morals. In terms of science, there cannot be science if there is no Logos—no basis of reason. In terms of metaphysics, ideas and notions can be as concrete as the laws of physics. It’s one of the miracles of communication that we can even have this conversation. In order for that to occur, there must be a substance beyond the physical. An order or Archetype and commonly shared themes. And when you tap into those archetypes and themes—or as Plato called them Form—you begin to reason up to an ideal Form of good, who Christ personified. It’s very easy for me to believe in Him for that reason.

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            1. jdoublep says:

              Define “greatest sages”. Why is Logos the basis of human reason? Define “substance beyond the physical”. Although modern telecommunications are miraculous – truly most of our lives today are – it does not flow that because we can: speak/read/write/send comments on blogs that there must be a substance beyond the physical. (I’m not arguing against such, but rather that you’ve leaped from the miracle of internetworked systems to asserting something beyond the physical.) It’s very easy for me to believe in you based on Platonic forms. It’s even easier for me to believe in you because you are exactly what is intended. But again I ask: define “you”.

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              1. Well, exactly what a sage is. And the greatest of them. They confirm Christ’s teachings. So, it’s discoverable. Something real that isn’t physical. Like an idea, and its consequences. I’m not talking about technology. I’m talking about the nature of communication. Precisely, that I can define something. That’s important for reason. Well, I’m not the ultimate form of Good. Jesus is. I won’t define myself. But, Jesus, as defined in the Old and New Testament. He found real principles, and he demonstrated them. That’s why I choose to believe in Him.

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              2. Well, Logos is reason. It’s the foundation of reason. It’s the substance of reason.

                I guess as Paul said in Hebrews, “Faith is the substance of things hoped for, the evidence of things unseen.” The Logos is the substance of the thing hoped for, and the Logos is the evidence of the things unseen. Or, in other terms, Christ.

                As Paul said, all I know is Christ.

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                1. jdoublep says:

                  Thanks. That’s why I inquired in what sense you were using the term. The Greeks saw Logos slightly differently from the Hebrews until the two lines of thinking melded under Hellenistic Judaism.

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                2. Actually, I find them one in the same. I think Logos is a discoverable concept. I think Lao Tsu and Plato discovered it. I think it’s one of the bridges to God. However, it can be dangerous to come to it without knowledge of Who God is. I think that’s one of the problems with cults, actually, is that they find power, but they warp it and confuse the order of creation. It’s also one of the problems with philosophy.

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                3. Like, it’s no doubt the Greeks found God. Paul talks about that on Mars Hill. It’s just, they only found radical glimpses of Him, and that’s why God had to reveal Himself through the Hebrew Prophets and Apostles, and finally HIs Son.

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                4. I’m not saying use philosophy to find God. I just find it fascinating how philosophers could predict things such as Lucretius, without having access to God. Like, obviously, you need Jesus to make sense of anything. I use philosophy to reflect on God and his interactions with the world. I’m not interested in the philosophers, but rather interested in how they often come to conclusions we take for granted. Without any hard science. Like, Moral knowledge is just as scientific as calculus; it’s a lot more difficult, too. And that’s why we need God, is so we know right from wrong. But, it doesn’t mean that God is this circular path. Things aren’t true because of God. But rather, we know God because the whole truth points to Him. What those philosophers and sages got right, God had already written about in the Bible. Which, confirms the Bible in my mind. But, on things related to doubt, I trust the Bible because it proves itself true in the real world. So, I can either trust in my own morality—which is disastrous and leads to much unneeded suffering—or I can trust in God’s Word, and I find it produces more results than leaning on my own understanding.

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                5. jdoublep says:

                  I appreciate that you can lean on and lean into your religion with engagement, delight, and joy, and that it helps fully inform your existence. That’s what religion should be used for! I just don’t share that engagement with Abrahamic traditions (I don’t see the universe as a creation nor monarch) – though I have no doubt that devotion to Christ will bring you salvation (that’s bhakti yoga). 🙂

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                6. jdoublep says:

                  And that is exactly where I hope your devotion to Christ will lead: eternal relationship with God of all! Hoo-ray to that for real!

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        1. jdoublep says:

          Please define “you”. Please define “savior”. From my perspective, lord/king/ruler are roughly interchangeable terms typically used when describing monarchial structures of governing. You may expound on your usage if need be, or if that is not manner in which I should contextualize the word “Lord”.

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            1. jdoublep says:

              Thank you. I myself do not consider the universe a kingdom nor God a monarch (I’m fairly committed to democracy, however rough it seems at present. 🙂 ) But that does help me understand your point-of-view and the context of your commentary.

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                1. jdoublep says:

                  You statement leads to an important question: if everything is part of God’s Kingdom, where does Satan’s Kingdom lie?

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                2. That’s a good way of looking at it. But, he’s also like a subordinate king in a principate. He’ll be a viceroy in hell, while God and His saints will reign the blessed parts of the kingdom.

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                3. jdoublep says:

                  🙂 It’s all too literal a read of what heaven and hell/good and evil are for me. (And, need I say it again, too focused on the monarchy.)

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      3. P.S.

        The belief in aliens causes paranoia and psychosis. The reason why is that believing in them comes with some unnatural thoughts. They are a warping of the Logos, and when they become objective they will create delusion, mania… in affect, when you see them it’s a form of Psychosis. You shouldn’t see aliens. The mere acceptance of them—serious acceptance—creates strong fixed beliefs in unnatural phenomena, and it makes one unstable. It’s dangerous… I know that from experience. You shouldn’t believe in aliens because they don’t exist.

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        1. jdoublep says:

          Define “unnatural” and “unnatural phenomena”. Are you using Logos here in the Greek sense or the Hebrew (or another tradition)? Either way, I would ask how one is capable of warping divine reason? Your claim that, “the belief in aliens causes paranoia and psychosis” does warrant some sort of backing proof. This is a different type of claim from your prior comments. The claim needs qualified with a “may” but the likelier truth seems its inverse: Having paranoid and/or psychotic tendencies may cause a greater likelihood in a belief in aliens. Your later assertions in this comment also warrant some qualifications as it seems so far that most of your statements stem from personal experience – which doesn’t altogether invalidate – but certainly should not give rise to more generalized normative statements. There are plenty of people who believe alien life exists who don’t experience mania or psychosis. I would posit that such people do not believe in alien life in a conspiratorial way but rather in a way that accounts for the age and size of the universe coupled with the statistical likelihood that because life developed on earth, there is likely life elsewhere (intelligent or no).

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          1. Yeah. All of them are deluded. Or as the Bible says, “Given unto strong delusion.” I wish I could tell you more, but all the secrets are revealed to me and some of them only a select few would have empirical knowledge of. In other words, I can’t answer this. Only that you have to have faith in God, otherwise when aliens do become normative, and people “know” they exist, you’ll be carried away into the delusions that will come with it.

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  3. P.S.S.

    I do the same thing with other delusions. Satan Kings, Illusions. I chalk it all up to demonic activity. Really, that’s what Schizophrenia is. And that’s part of what I have. It’s a warping of the psyche from abuse, and it creates pathologies which alienates you from the people you love. You have to fight those thoughts; I’m in remission with my illness right now because I resisted the thoughts—such as there being aliens, or Satan Kings, or what have you. It’s healed me of the problematic belief and has made me feel safer.

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    1. jdoublep says:

      I do not know what Satan Kings are (sounds like a motorcycle gang 🙂 ). With regards to your schizophrenia diagnosis, I am glad you are able to get on with living your life positively and productively. (A good friend of mine was similarly diagnosed in our early 20s and did not fare so well.) I most definitely agree with your assertion that, for those with lived experience similar to yours, such things may lead to severely debilitating distress and I am glad to read that of your healing.

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      1. Satan Kings are a literary device I created to help cope with my delusions. Basically, Schizzophrenia is when someone’s conscious touches their shadow self. And the Shadow Self is what would be called the “Flesh” in Christian theology. It’s something that we ought to have removed from us. Aggression, lust, blasphemy, bitterness. It’s in us, very prevalently, and Christ, being God, will remove that part of us. What is better called “Sin”. We won’t be perfect, but we will undergo a sanctification process that will remove that from us.

        The “Satan Kings” are usually doppelganger like themes which play on the subconscious tendencies my mind experiences while dreaming. It’s the evil part of me that I want removed by Christ.

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  4. P.S.S.S.

    Believing in that stuff drove me mad. It made me doubt everything, and made me sick. I now have a clear mind because I can see that stuff is faulty. It doesn’t exist. Unless you allow it to exist, and then it consumes you.

    Be at peace. God bless.

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    1. jdoublep says:

      Thanks for the thorough response. Peace be with you also. I will reply individually to each our your comments as I work my way through them. Regarding this comment: How did believing in aliens make you doubt everything? Did that doubt in everything also extend to belief in aliens? What qualities about your mind today makes your mind clear: less doubt, less anxiety, greater ability to focus? Or, what entails a clear mind? How does one allow or disallow a thing to exist in this world? One has no control over the existence of a rock, for example – though one could I suppose grind the rock to dust and throw it into a river, if that’s what you mean by “allow it to exist”: actively destroy. But how does one do that with an apparition or, more difficult still, an thought or process of thoughts? Thoughts exist. One really can’t control when they arise or of what they might consist. I grant that one does have the ability to somewhat control any downstream action taken based on the appearance of a thought. But thoughts themselves come – and then they go, yes? Often it seems the act of not trying to think a thought causes more of the same thought to arise.

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