A rhetorical question is a figure of speech in the form of a question that is asked in order to make a point rather than to elicit an answer

Who could all this for be if not you?

This “I”?
This “v”?
This simple, slow rhythm gently galloping along the page?
This golden-beaked finch in my left hand?
This whale in my aching belly?
This trembling lip holding back a sputtering flood?
This supple caress of your tired thigh?
This silent shout across the evening horizon?
This blinding, crippling insight?

Who, if not you?

This quaking desire crumbling to dust every holy temple?
This blistering heat setting fire to every last library?
This loverly confusion occluding every way?
This exasperated existence defined by your name?

Whose name, if not yours?

Whose face to dream, if not yours?
Whose body to enlighten, if not yours?
Whose soul to ignite, if not yours?
Who? Who? Like a goddamn owl, if not you?

Tell me.

     Tell me.

          Whisper it to me.
          Sneak into my room.
          In the early afternoon.
          Whisper your name.

A rhetorical question is a figure of speech in the form of a question that is asked in order to make a point rather than to elicit an answer

12 thoughts on “A rhetorical question is a figure of speech in the form of a question that is asked in order to make a point rather than to elicit an answer

  1. Brilliant! and hard core poem.

    This poem my friend is the definition to me as true Avant-garde poetry.

    I really like the surrealistic questions you impose on here with your creative thoughts.
    The flow of this piece is remarkable and so soothing. ๐Ÿ™‚

    Two-Thumbs way up! my friend.

    ๐Ÿ™‚

    We should collaborate on a poem sometime.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks, homie. I would love to collaborate though you are a billion times pushing poetic envelopes that I can’t even dream up. We should talk about your chapbook(s) too. I don’t think you need to wait on your friend to reprint them.

      Liked by 1 person

Sock it to me

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