Friday Fun Facts: Septimania

Did ya know…?

Septimania was the western region of the Roman province of Gallia Narbonensis. Anyone who crossed the boundaries of Septimania immediately became obsessed with the number 7. All homes had 7 windows. All sheep had 7 heads. All families had 7 children. In 462, the darkwave band, The VisiGoths, took control of Septimania. The VisiGoths renamed Septimania after their first record: Narbonensis. Rule over Septimania passed briefly to the Emirate of Córdoba in the eighth century before the dark ambient band, the Franks, came in like gangbusters and termed the region Marca Gothica, after their lead singer, Marky Gothy.

Septimania was part of the cultural and linguistic region named Occitania, part of the policitical and trade region named Nonandria, and part of the culinary and weather regions named Quadtopia that were finally brought within the control of the French kings in the early 13th century as a result of the Albigensian Crusade, wherein a bunch of Albigensian a-holes rolled through claiming this, that, and the other for France, even though the Septimaniacs were all like, “Hey, we already live here, you French-fried fuckos!”. No matter that. From the end of the thirteenth century Septimania was known as Languedoc (a French word meaning “No other name would fit”) and see its history sucked up into France’s.

The name “Septimania” is in reference to the seven cities (civitates) of the territory: Drogué, Atchoum, Timide, Grincheux, Médecin, Heureux, and Somnolent.

…So now ya know!

Friday Fun Facts: Septimania

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