Zoo

Last night.
Zoo.
Yes, horse fuckers. (Hate to think what kinda traffic that’ll drive my way.)
Interesting.
Not compelling (though I give it props for effort and capturing the beauty of Seattle).
Worth your time?
That depends.
The director states this about the film’s conceit: “This was a guy who was a conservative man at one point, and those ideas started breaking down for him. I think that 9/11 triggered a lot of it. But he was [also] in the center of one of the most secretive military complexes. Meanwhile, he listened to a lot of left-wing radio, he questioned everything our government was involved in, and he was ethically conflicted about his job and the money he was making. That’s the core fascination for me.” None of that at all came across to me. There’s a single moment where the gentlemen in question has a breakdown of sorts and starts rattling some jibberish but there’s not much context for what that is or why.
Another item to positively comment on is the interesting way in which the documentary is put together. The film is narrated by the actual people involved in the incident, yet the on-screen action is played out by actors. Sort of like an art-house dramatization, like Unsolved Mysteries with horse fucking.

Zoo