Film Fest

Holy celluloid, is planning a film fest ever fun!
As much as I hate the attention-to-detail attitude that administrative work requires, I was born to adminstrate and coordinate.
If I weren’t so jaded, I’d take that skill to the political arena.
But back to planning a film festival:
Wonder how much it costs to rent a cinema for a day to show free movies? Could the rental fee be covered on advertisement dollars alone? Does KC already have an “official” Horror Film Fest?
Funny thing is, I’m not a big fan of horror films. That role falls to my brother, Matt. He’ll watch any and every scary/gory movie that comes out and enjoy 99% of them. Not me. I want my scary movies to be a well-realized creative endeavor first and foremost. I realize that’s subjective, yeah, yeah, but you bitches know what I mean. Attention to set and psychological details, unique story, innovative camera work, capable acting – I want my horror flicks to have most of those attributes…but be scary to boot. I know this is wanting to have my cake and eat it too – and I’m able to budge quite a bit in my critical stance – but I’m not a fanboy of the horror genre because most forays into the subject are terrible terrible terrible. (e.g. Hostel.) So, yeah. I think when you see the line-up for our film fest, you too will say, “Yeah, those are all actually enjoyable, entertaining films AND artistically notable.” And that satisfies me in such a way that the entire process, from conceptualization to preparation to execution, is wholly enjoyable. Plus, it helps to have Sarah’s support and input and general interest in reifying this idea.

Film Fest

Horror

Again, we’re hosting this horror film fest this weekend and we’re doing our research – watching and reading and studying and opinionating on films (though we’re only showing two, the other 8 films will be brought by the people who show up – yes, we’re showing 10 films total) and here’s an awesome quote I found in one review of The Shining:

It’s horror for people who know that true horror isn’t being stalked by a man in a mask, but being trapped alone with your family in a place with no TV.

That, my friends, is a brilliant insight.

Horror

Last week at this office

And I have no real interest in working. Go figure.

I thought I would write a bit this afternoon about Last House on the Left, Wes Craven’s first film. Sarah and I are screening tons of horror flicks for an upcoming film fest we’re hosting and LHOTL was one in the queue. Here’s what I liked about it: the creepy scenes were generally creepy. Watching psychopaths impose their will upon others is unsettling. Here’s what I didn’t like about it: the Hee-Haw soundtrack and bumbling cop duo (featuring Kobra Kai himself, Martin Kove) served not to lighten the mood but to make the film seem like a twisted side-plot in an episode of The Dukes of Hazzard. I couldn’t help but wonder why this attempt at comic relief. Adding to this, after the film’s resolution into vengeful barbarism, the credits roll to the same boppy banjo music and has still photos of the cast at their smiling best, a virtual “Those Were the Days” of an ending. Didn’t seem to fit at all. Anyway, it’s worth watching, just to see one of the founding films of contemporary horror. Also, Craven’s producer on the film, Sean Cunningham, is the guy who started the Friday the 13th series. In effect, Last House on the Left is two guys, working with a neophyte’s balls-to-the-wall gusto, wanting to do something no one had seen before. (That last phrase reminds me – Last House on the Left features an awesome nightmare blowjob scene.) It’s not a great film, but not without some merit.

Last week at this office

I’m Your Man

So there’s this documentary about Leonard Cohen:

here i am
And there’s the soundtrack that accompanies it that features all sorts of great artists covering Cohen’s songs:
1. Tower Of Song – Martha Wainwright
2. Tonight Will Be Fine – Teddy Thompson
3. I’m Your Man – Nick Cave
4. Winter Lady – Martha Wainwright, Kate & Anna McGarrigle
5. Sisters Of Mercy – Beth Orton
6. Chelsea Hotel No.2 – Rufus Wainwright
7. If It Be Your Will – Antony
8. I Can’t Forget – Jarvis Cocker
9. Famous Blue Raincoat – The Handsome Family
10. Bird On A Wire – Perla Batalla
11. Everybody Knows – Rufus Wainwright
12. The Traitor – Martha Wainwright
13. Suzanne – Perla Batalla, Nick Cave & Julie Christensen
14. The Future – Teddy Thompson
15. Anthem – Perla Batalla, Julie Christensen
16. Tower Of Song – Leonard Cohen & U2

And whilst listening to that soundtrack this morning I’m for some reason overtaken by the idea that I’m in the autumnal years of my life. Look:

I imagine I’ll live to be about 60. (Having Type 1 diabetes should shave off a number of years from the American male’s typical lifespan.) So, given that, and dividing by 4, I’m through the Spring and Summer years, which respectively correlate to 1-15 and 15-30 with Spring given over to the beginning of life and Summer given to adolescence’s wanton abandon. Now’re the Autumn years, bringing with them a change of color, a slowing-down of the life force and a general feeling of needing to prepare for the Winter still to come.

Why did L. Cohen’s words spark this thought? I dunno. But I suggest you get yourself a copy of New Skin for the Old Ceremony and settle into some thoughts of your own. Winter’ll be here before you know it.

I’m Your Man