The more things change, the more they stay the same

The peculiar Americanism sensed by so many visitors to Kansas City, nevertheless, does not derive primarily from census statistics or an operation of the melting pot principle. It is, at bottom, a product of the basic experiences which this community through the last century has shared with the country as a whole, perhaps more intimately than any other American city.

As an outgrowth of those experiences, Kansas City has exhibited during the last hundred years certain well-defined characteristics. Because it was constantly having to deal with new problems, for example, the community early acquired its habit of forgetting the past, ignoring the present, and living almost altogether in the future. [emphasis added – jpp]

from City of the Future: A narrative history of Kansas City, 1850-1950, by Henry C. Haskell Jr. and Richard B. Fowler, 1950.

The more things change, the more they stay the same